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Resilience program brings awareness to Team V

Pauline Chui, 30th Space Wing community support coordinator, speaks with an Airman about the Resilience Race program during the monthly wing run, Jan. 6, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The incentive-based program will provide personnel a chance to learn more about helping agencies on Vandenberg, in addition to earning a prize once completed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Robert J. Volio/Released)

Pauline Chui, 30th Space Wing community support coordinator, speaks with an Airman about the Resilience Race program during the monthly wing run, Jan. 6, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The incentive-based program will provide personnel a chance to learn more about helping agencies on Vandenberg, in addition to earning a prize once completed. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Robert J. Volio/Released)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

At Vandenberg, there are a plethora of helping agencies that exist to provide support for Airmen and their families. Organizations such as the Airman & Family Readiness Center, Child Development Center, and Family Advocacy all play their part in the health and wellness of Team V’s most valuable asset – its Airmen.

In order to increase awareness of these services, these helping agencies recently joined forces to create the Resilience Race program, which will run from Jan. 6 through Feb. 10.

“The Resilience Race is an opportunity for all members of Team V to learn about the helping agency services available on base,” said Emily Dreiling, 30th Space Wing sexual assault response coordinator. “January is a time many individuals reflect on making positive changes in their lives, and the helping agencies wanted to create a program that would provide a road map to where these services are located, and ensure our base population is aware of the many services available to them. Unfortunately, many services still go underutilized each year because people are unaware of what is available to them.”

The incentive-based program will provide personnel a chance to learn more about each participating agency and earn a prize once completed.

“To begin, visit any of the participating agencies to pick up your resilience passport,” said Dreiling. “The objective of the race is to visit eight resilience stops over the next five weeks. Once you have visited all eight stops, bring your completed passport to the COVE, or Community Organizations for Vandenberg’s Enrichment, located in the Wing Headquarters building, Suite A101. All military members and employees will be presented a certificate of resilience and Comprehensive Airman Fitness coin presented by their leadership. Family members will be given a picnic mat at the time they turn in their passport.”

The COVE will be the new designated location for future classes and programs intended to increase resiliency and awareness for a multitude of programs.

“The COVE is like our hub of all the collaborative efforts behind the Integrated Delivery Systems and the Community Action Information Board,” said Pauline Chui, 30th SW community support coordinator. “Everything we’re doing to help improve the health and well-being of our community, our Airmen and their families, is going to begin here. This is putting a priority on our families, our Airmen and their wellness. I think it’s really exciting that we’re going to have this designated area set aside to make sure we have a training area for teaching resilience. We’re going to be teaching our resilience classes, suicide awareness, Green Dot and all these other things here.”

Chui hopes Team V members take advantage of these resources to sharpen their resilience, which she considers a vital trait.

“Strengthening and maintaining resilience is important because, in the military, we’re faced with many hardships that can affect our well-being,” said Chui. “Resiliency is a skill that needs to be practiced and maintained in order to be effective when needed. It’s vital that we keep ourselves prepared and fit physically, mentally, spiritually and socially. Everyone’s going to be faced with tough times. It’s not a question of ‘if’ but rather ‘when’.”