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30th SW commander, command chief address wing

Col. Michael Hough, 30th Space Wing commander, speaks to Airmen during an All Call, July 25, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Accompanied by Chief Master Sgt. Diena Mosely, 30th SW command chief, the duo used their first official All Call to formally introduce themselves and their priorities to the wing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ian Dudley/Released)

Col. Michael Hough, 30th Space Wing commander, speaks to Airmen during an All Call, July 25, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Accompanied by Chief Master Sgt. Diena Mosely, 30th SW command chief, the duo used their first official All Call to formally introduce themselves and their priorities to the wing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ian Dudley/Released)

Chief Master Sgt. Diena Mosely, 30th SW command chief, speaks to Airmen during an All Call, July 25, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Accompanied by Col. Michael Hough, 30th Space Wing commander, the duo used their first official All Call to formally introduce themselves and their priorities to the wing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ian Dudley/Released)

Chief Master Sgt. Diena Mosely, 30th SW command chief, speaks to Airmen during an All Call, July 25, 2017, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Accompanied by Col. Michael Hough, 30th Space Wing commander, the duo used their first official All Call to formally introduce themselves and their priorities to the wing. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Ian Dudley/Released)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

Col. Michael Hough, 30th Space Wing commander, and Chief Master Sgt. Diena Mosely, 30th SW command chief, held two sessions of a base-wide All Call, here, July 25.

Hough and Mosely used their first official All Call to formally introduce themselves and their priorities to the wing.

“Customs and courtesies are important to me, it’s a necessary part of what we do in the Air Force,” said Hough. “But what matters even more to me is common courtesy, the way you treat other people as a whole. Respecting one another is the foundation of conducting our mission, and if we can’t do that, we won’t be effective at our jobs. This is very important to me.”

Hough emphasized the importance of taking care of the individual, laying it out as a top priority for mission accomplishment.

“It is about you, and taking care of the person next to you,” said Hough. “If you are not healthy, if you are worried about finances, or what is going on at home, or any other issues, you won’t be able to conduct the mission to your fullest capability. Just asking the question, ‘are you doing ok?’ to your team can be enough. I ask you to take care of one another. I am not just asking the supervisors and commanders, but everyone, down to Airman Basic.”

Reinforcing the commander’s comments, Mosely challenged Team V to rethink why they joined the Air Force initially, and what makes them excited to wake up in the morning.

“What is your ‘why?’” said Mosely. “We all joined the Air Force for different reasons. But whatever that reason was, when you initially joined, revisit that reason. On that day, you continued on, you enlisted, or you commissioned, and you decided you were going to do this. Whatever your enthusiasm was that day, I ask that you revisit that and make sure that you still have your ‘why’. Some of us came in because we wanted to serve our country, because we wanted to travel, or to take better care of our families. If you have accomplished that original reason, then reinvigorate yourself. Find out what is your ‘why’ now. Is it to take care of Airmen? Is it to get down range and accomplish the mission? I challenge you to think about that.”

Mosely encouraged Airmen and civilians alike to share any ideas with leadership that will help and shape the future of the Air Force.

“Being an Airman is not easy, and we ask more and more of you every day,” said Mosely. “We understand that you will make mistakes, we understand that this may be your first time away from home. We know you bring a lot to the table, you have a lot to offer by way of innovation. We ask that you tap into that innovation and share those ideas with leadership. Don’t be afraid to share those ideas. I won’t be here in the coming years and you will. As Airmen make sure you find a mentor. It is not automatically your supervisor. Choose someone that will tell you the good from the bad. Someone that will tell you the truth when you are doing it right and someone that will let you know when you aren’t.”

Before the floor was opened up to questions, Hough added how impressed he was with Team V’s work ethic and professionalism.

“I love it here, I am so glad to be here. I am constantly impressed when I walk around base, with the level of professionalism,” said Hough. “So when I see these experts all over base I think to myself, ‘thank God it is not all on my shoulders, and that I have you to rely on.’”