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Team Vandenberg Launches the NASA DART Mission

people stand in a circle having a meeting

Members of the Vandenberg Fire Department conduct an operations brief in preparation for a static fire test at Vandenberg Space Force Base, Calif., Nov. 19, 2021. The firefighters discussed actions plans, communications, and team priorities as the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket was readied for the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) space mission. (U.S. Space Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Sanchez)

firetrucks parked on the side of the road

Vandenberg Fire Department fire trucks and support vehicles stay ready to respond in case of a fire during a static fire test of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket at Vandenberg Space Force base, Calif., Nov. 19, 2021. Firefighters train to support various incidents which could include fire on the launch facilities or the surrounding environment. (U.S. Space Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Sanchez)

helicopter drops water on fire

Santa Barbara County Fire Department Helicopter 308 douses an environmental fire with water on Vandenberg Space Force Base, Calif., Nov. 19, 2021. The water assisted Vandenberg Fire Department personnel as they responded to the fire that resulted from a static test fire of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket, in preparation for the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) Space Mission. (U.S. Space Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Sanchez)

fireman dig through scalded dirt

Vandenberg Fire Department Personnel search the area for hot spots and lingering burning material after extinguishing an environmental fire on Vandenberg Space Force Base, Calif, Nov. 19, 2021. The fire was a result of the nearby SpaceX Falcon 9 static fire test, in preparation for NASA’s Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) Space Mission. (U.S. Space Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Sanchez)

Man talks on radio

U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Alexander Salamacha, 30th Civil Engineer Squadron north battalion chief, communicates with other firefighters on his radio after a rocket launch at Vandenberg Space Force Base, Calif., Nov. 23, 2021. The crews were coordinating to clear the launch facility and check the area for fires. The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket successfully launched the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) space mission. (U.S. Space Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Sanchez)

Team Vandenberg Launches the NASA DART Mission

A SpaceX Falcon 9 carrying NASA’s first planetary defense test mission, the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), launches from Space Launch Complex-4 at Vandenberg Space Force Base, CA, Nov. 23, 2021, at 10:21 p.m. Pacific Time. The DART spacecraft is designed to direct itself to impact an asteroid while traveling at a speed of roughly 15,000 miles per hour (24,000 kilometers per hour). Its target is the asteroid moonlet Dimorphos (Greek for “two forms”), which orbits a larger asteroid named Didymos (Greek for “twin”). In fall 2022, DART is projected to impact Dimorphos to change its orbit within the Didymos binary asteroid system. The Didymos system is the ideal candidate for DART because it poses no actual impact threat to Earth, and scientists can measure the change in Dimorphos’ orbit with ground-based telescopes. (U.S. Space Force photo by Amn Kadielle Shaw)

Team Vandenberg Launches the NASA DART Mission

A SpaceX Falcon 9 carrying NASA’s first planetary defense test mission, the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), launches from Space Launch Complex-4 at Vandenberg Space Force Base, CA, Nov. 23, 2021, at 10:21 p.m. Pacific Time. The DART spacecraft is designed to direct itself to impact an asteroid while traveling at a speed of roughly 15,000 miles per hour (24,000 kilometers per hour). Its target is the asteroid moonlet Dimorphos (Greek for “two forms”), which orbits a larger asteroid named Didymos (Greek for “twin”). In fall 2022, DART is projected to impact Dimorphos to change its orbit within the Didymos binary asteroid system. The Didymos system is the ideal candidate for DART because it poses no actual impact threat to Earth, and scientists can measure the change in Dimorphos’ orbit with ground-based telescopes. (U.S. Space Force photo by Amn Kadielle Shaw)

Team Vandenberg Launches the NASA DART Mission

A SpaceX Falcon 9 carrying NASA’s first planetary defense test mission, the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), launches from Space Launch Complex-4 at Vandenberg Space Force Base, CA, Nov. 23, 2021, at 10:21 p.m. Pacific Time. The DART spacecraft is designed to direct itself to impact an asteroid while traveling at a speed of roughly 15,000 miles per hour (24,000 kilometers per hour). Its target is the asteroid moonlet Dimorphos (Greek for “two forms”), which orbits a larger asteroid named Didymos (Greek for “twin”). In fall 2022, DART is projected to impact Dimorphos to change its orbit within the Didymos binary asteroid system. The Didymos system is the ideal candidate for DART because it poses no actual impact threat to Earth, and scientists can measure the change in Dimorphos’ orbit with ground-based telescopes. (U.S. Space Force photo by Amn Kadielle Shaw)

people on lawn watch Rocket Launch in the Distance

Members of the Vandenberg Fire Department, Security Forces and other supporting units watch a rocket launch at Vandenberg Space Force Base, Calif., Nov. 23, 2021. The SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched into space supporting the NASA Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART) space mission. This was the first planetary defense space mission. (U.S. Space Force photo by Senior Airman Daniel Sanchez)

Team Vandenberg Launches the NASA DART Mission
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A SpaceX Falcon 9 carrying NASA’s first planetary defense test mission, the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), launches from Space Launch Complex-4 at Vandenberg Space Force Base, CA, Nov. 23, 2021, at 10:21 p.m. Pacific Time. The DART spacecraft is designed to direct itself to impact an asteroid while traveling at a speed of roughly 15,000 miles per hour (24,000 kilometers per hour). Its target is the asteroid moonlet Dimorphos (Greek for “two forms”), which orbits a larger asteroid named Didymos (Greek for “twin”). In fall 2022, DART is projected to impact Dimorphos to change its orbit within the Didymos binary asteroid system. The Didymos system is the ideal candidate for DART because it poses no actual impact threat to Earth, and scientists can measure the change in Dimorphos’ orbit with ground-based telescopes. (U.S. Space Force photo by Michael Peterson)

Team Vandenberg Launches the NASA DART Mission
PHOTO DETAILS  /   DOWNLOAD HI-RES 11 of 11

A SpaceX Falcon 9 carrying NASA’s first planetary defense test mission, the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART), launches from Space Launch Complex-4 at Vandenberg Space Force Base, CA, Nov. 23, 2021, at 10:21 p.m. Pacific Time. The DART spacecraft is designed to direct itself to impact an asteroid while traveling at a speed of roughly 15,000 miles per hour (24,000 kilometers per hour). Its target is the asteroid moonlet Dimorphos (Greek for “two forms”), which orbits a larger asteroid named Didymos (Greek for “twin”). In fall 2022, DART is projected to impact Dimorphos to change its orbit within the Didymos binary asteroid system. The Didymos system is the ideal candidate for DART because it poses no actual impact threat to Earth, and scientists can measure the change in Dimorphos’ orbit with ground-based telescopes. (U.S. Space Force photo by Michael Peterson)

Vandenberg Space Force Base, Calif. --