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There is a NuStar in the sky

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.-- An Orbital Sciences Corporation owned L-1011 "Stargazer? takes-off with a Pegasus rocket carrying the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array satellite here Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The NuSTAR satellite will image high-energy X-rays, giving scientists a new perspective on black holes, supernovae and galactic nuclei. (U.S. Air Force photo/Michael Peterson)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.-- An Orbital Sciences Corporation owned L-1011 "Stargazer? takes-off with a Pegasus rocket carrying the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array satellite here Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The NuSTAR satellite will image high-energy X-rays, giving scientists a new perspective on black holes, supernovae and galactic nuclei. (U.S. Air Force photo/Michael Peterson)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.-- An Orbital Sciences Corporation owned L-1011 "Stargazer? takes-off with a Pegasus rocket carrying the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array satellite here Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The NuSTAR satellite will image high-energy X-rays, giving scientists a new perspective on black holes, supernovae and galactic nuclei. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.-- An Orbital Sciences Corporation owned L-1011 "Stargazer? takes-off with a Pegasus rocket carrying the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array satellite here Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The NuSTAR satellite will image high-energy X-rays, giving scientists a new perspective on black holes, supernovae and galactic nuclei. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.-- An Orbital Sciences Corporation owned L-1011 "Stargazer” takes-off with a Pegasus rocket carrying the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array satellite here Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The NuSTAR satellite will image high-energy X-rays, giving scientists a new perspective on black holes, supernovae and galactic nuclei. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Levi Riendeau)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.-- An Orbital Sciences Corporation owned L-1011 "Stargazer” takes-off with a Pegasus rocket carrying the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array satellite here Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The NuSTAR satellite will image high-energy X-rays, giving scientists a new perspective on black holes, supernovae and galactic nuclei. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Levi Riendeau)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.-- An Orbital Sciences Corporation owned L-1011 "Stargazer” takes-off with a Pegasus rocket carrying the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array satellite here Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The NuSTAR satellite will image high-energy X-rays, giving scientists a new perspective on black holes, supernovae and galactic nuclei. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Levi Riendeau)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.-- An Orbital Sciences Corporation owned L-1011 "Stargazer” takes-off with a Pegasus rocket carrying the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array satellite here Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The NuSTAR satellite will image high-energy X-rays, giving scientists a new perspective on black holes, supernovae and galactic nuclei. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Levi Riendeau)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.-- An Orbital Sciences Corporation owned L-1011 "Stargazer” takes-off with a Pegasus rocket carrying the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array satellite here Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The NuSTAR satellite will image high-energy X-rays, giving scientists a new perspective on black holes, supernovae and galactic nuclei. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Levi Riendeau)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif.-- An Orbital Sciences Corporation owned L-1011 "Stargazer” takes-off with a Pegasus rocket carrying the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array satellite here Tuesday, June 5, 2012. The NuSTAR satellite will image high-energy X-rays, giving scientists a new perspective on black holes, supernovae and galactic nuclei. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Levi Riendeau)