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Vandenberg hosts Save-A-Life Tour

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Chief Master Sgt. Angelica Johnson, the 30th Space Wing command chief, takes a test drive in a driving under the influence simulator during the Save-A-Life Tour at the Pacific Coast Club here Monday, May 23, 2011.  The tour showed base members the importance of not drinking alcohol and driving.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Chief Master Sgt. Angelica Johnson, the 30th Space Wing command chief, takes a test drive in a driving under the influence simulator during the Save-A-Life Tour at the Pacific Coast Club here Monday, May 23, 2011. The tour showed base members the importance of not drinking alcohol and driving. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Jeremiah Newson, the Save-A-Life Tour manager, briefs Team V members during the Save-A-Life Tour at the Pacific Coast Club here Monday, May 23, 2011.  The briefing showed base members the importance of not drinking alcohol and driving.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Jeremiah Newson, the Save-A-Life Tour manager, briefs Team V members during the Save-A-Life Tour at the Pacific Coast Club here Monday, May 23, 2011. The briefing showed base members the importance of not drinking alcohol and driving. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Jeremiah Newson, the Save-A-Life Tour manager, briefs Team V members during the Save-A-Life Tour at the Pacific Coast Club here Monday, May 23, 2011.  The briefing showed base members the importance of not drinking alcohol and driving.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Jeremiah Newson, the Save-A-Life Tour manager, briefs Team V members during the Save-A-Life Tour at the Pacific Coast Club here Monday, May 23, 2011. The briefing showed base members the importance of not drinking alcohol and driving. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Andrew Satran)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- The 30th Space Wing held the Save-A-Life Tour at the Pacific Coast Club here May 23.

The Save-A-Life Tour, a national civilian-run program, has been providing information to increase awareness of the dangers of drinking and driving since 2001. The tour marks the beginning of the Air Force's 2011 Critical Days of Summer campaign , which occurs between May 27 and Sept. 6.

The Save-A-Life Tour, sponsored by the Air Force Safety Center, provided a 20-minute video that contained graphic footage of what has happened to those people who decided to drive drunk, and to those who were caught in their path. The presentation was topped off by the story of Jacqueline Saburido.

Pictures of Jacqueline, as a young girl, flashed on the screen. The presentation ended with pictures shown of Jacqueline as a disfigured burn victim. Jacqueline is the victim of the choices made by a young man who drove drunk, crossed the median and hit Jacqueline's car head on. The crash killed her friends and left Jacqueline burned alive. This feature was presented as a sobering look at the reality of drinking and driving.

"Be there for your friends and take the keys away, you only have one life don't waste it," said Jeremiah Newson, a Save-A- Life Tour manager. "If you had the power to save someone, would you?"

The Save-A-Life Tour was introduced to military personnel to bring a new prospective, or perhaps reiterate an old perspective, to the effects of drinking and driving.

After the video, attendees were given a chance to try the drunk driving simulator. First up was Chief Master Sgt. Angelica Johnson, the 30th Space Wing command chief. The simulator mimics the increased levels of blood-alcohol toxicity by creating a delay in the reaction time of up to one second.

"Use your resources like Airmen Against Drunk Driving, your supervisor or first sergeant, a wingman or a taxi," said Mike Trudeau, from the 30th Space Wing Safety Office. "You might be embarrassed, but you won't be dead."