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Patrolman won't copout at chance to play disc golf

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Following his toss, Tech. Sgt. Larry Kirk, a 30th Security Forces Squadron patrolman, nails the basket (his target) at Vandenberg’s disc golf course here Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010. Vandenberg’s disc golf course is free and open to all personnel with base access. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Steve Bauer)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Following his toss, Tech. Sgt. Larry Kirk, a 30th Security Forces Squadron patrolman, nails the basket (his target) at Vandenberg’s disc golf course here Wednesday, Aug. 11, 2010. Vandenberg’s disc golf course is free and open to all personnel with base access. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Steve Bauer)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Just how far will athletes travel to play the sport they are most passionate about?

For Tech. Sgt. Larry Kirk, a 30th Security Forces Squadron patrolman, there is no limit within the boundaries of the United States. The sport - disc golf.

As a matter of fact, Sergeant Kirk's goal is to play disc golf in each of the 50 states, which he is already extremely close to accomplishing. He has played disc golf in every state excluding those among the New England region.

Similar to the game of golf, the object of the disc game is for players to traverse a course from beginning to end throwing discs (rather than striking a golf ball with a club) at a target or the disc pole hole in the fewest number of throws of the disc.

Being brought up in a small town near St. Joseph, Mo., there were not a whole lot of activities that held his attention. However, that was before his senior year of high school, said Sergeant Kirk.

"During my senior year, a friend of mine introduced me to disc golf," he said. "He knew how much I liked golf and thought I would also enjoy the disc version of the game. And he was right; I have been playing ever since."

Although shift work often interferes with recreational type activities, Sergeant Kirk manages to play disc golf on an average of three times a week during his afternoons off. Luckily for the patrolman, Vandenberg has its own disc golf course.

"Vandenberg has a great course, it is very challenging," Sergeant Kirk said. "Because of its location, the wind can be the biggest challenge; the wind makes for great practice."

Disc golf is an inexpensive means of recreation and is a physically accessible activity for all ages.

"I always try getting people involved in new activities," Sergeant Kirk said. "I hope to start seeing more people use Vandenberg's disc golf course."

The base's disc golf course is free and open to all personnel with base access. Making it even easier to play disc golf at Vandenberg is the services of the Duane G. Wolfe Fitness and Sports Center, which offer disc golf equipment including disc drivers and putters. For more information about Vandenberg's disc golf course, call the base fitness center at 606-3832.