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AFRC hosts federal resume writing class

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Leading the class, Linda Crowder, an Airman and Family Readiness Center community readiness consultant, instructs a federal resume writing class at the AFRC here Wednesday, March 10, 2010. The class is offered throughout the year to educate people about the federal employment process. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Steve Bauer)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. – Leading the class, Linda Crowder, an Airman and Family Readiness Center community readiness consultant, instructs a federal resume writing class at the AFRC here Wednesday, March 10, 2010. The class is offered throughout the year to educate people about the federal employment process. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Steve Bauer)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Other than checking an applicant's employment history, how do federal employers pinpoint and make hiring selections?

Although answers to this question may vary for each employer, statistically applicants' who possess strongly-written resumes have a better chance of being selected for federal employment over applicants' who submit subpar resumes.

Fortunately for Vandenberg, the Airman and Family Readiness Center offers a federal resume writing class to help educate people about the federal employment process.

Class participants learn about the importance of networking, review the federal job process, research jobs, analyze core competencies, analyze vacancy announcements, apply for jobs, track applications, building interview skills and write cover letters and federal resumes.

"Resumes are the first way people are able to inform an employer about their interest in employment," said Linda Crowder, a community readiness consultant at the AFRC. "It is very important to have a solid resume when applying for federal positions because employers use the resumes as a means to getting back to the applicant. A resume is essentially an applicant's calling card."

Participants will also practice analyzing job vacancy announcements and interviewing skills with their classmates during the class.

Since federal employment positions are open to all eligible U.S. citizens, the AFRC's Federal Resume Writing class is open to everyone with installation access here.

"This class is for anyone who wants to work for the federal government," Ms. Crowder said. "Everyone can learn something from this class - things you have to do to be successful in any career. People who have attended this class reported having success in pursuing federal employment."

Active-duty members, who are leaving the military or are planning for retirement, can benefit from the federal resume writing class.

"I chose to attend the class because I plan on continuing my career in the federal government," said Master Sgt. Michael Brown, the 30th equal opportunity deputy director. "The class was very helpful toward preparing for that goal."

For more information about the AFRC's Federal Resume Writing class, or to find out when the next class is scheduled to be offered, call the AFRC at 606-0039.