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Sobering look into DUI prevention

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Chris Geysleek, a Save-A-Life Tour speaker, instructs Col. David Buck, the 30th Space Wing commander, how to drive a simulator during a presentation here March 18.  The Save-A-Life Tour travels around the United States informing young adults about the hazards of drinking and driving. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Antoinette Lyons)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Chris Geysleek, a Save-A-Life Tour speaker, instructs Col. David Buck, the 30th Space Wing commander, how to drive a simulator during a presentation here March 18. The Save-A-Life Tour travels around the United States informing young adults about the hazards of drinking and driving. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Antoinette Lyons)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- The 30th Space Wing hosted the National Save-A-Life Tour in the hangar at Building 1735 March 17. 

The Save-A-Life Tour is a civilian-run program that travels around the United States providing young adults with an informative presentation about the hazards of operating vehicles under the influence of alcohol. 

The intent of the presentation at Vandenberg was aimed at Airmen, 18-25 years of age, which is an age group that statistically accounts for the highest amount of fatalities due to alcohol-related automobile accidents each year. 

The program kicked off with a high-impact video that showed the devastating effects of drinking and driving. The video was graphic in nature purposefully to impact the Airmen. 

Once the video ended, Chris Geysleek, a Save-A-Life Tour representative, gave the audience some background information as to why he became a presenter for the Save-A-Life tour. 

Mr. Geysleek told the Airmen about a friend of his in college who was killed at an intersection by an intoxicated driver. The experience changed his life forever, said Mr. Geysleek. 

"It took somebody's life for me to realize the dangers behind drinking and driving," Mr. Geysleek said. He gives the presentations in hopes that the information will prevent at least one person from losing his life to the actions of a drunk driver. 

After Mr. Geysleek's presentation, he encouraged the Airmen to try the Save-A-Life Tour's 180-degree, realistic driving simulator, which allowed the Airmen to witness first-hand what happens to their driving capabilities when alcohol has been consumed. As the simulated blood-alcohol level of the drivers increased, Airmen found it more difficult to operate the vehicle. 

"The simulator is very realistic," said Airman 1st Class Robert Davis, a 30th Civil Engineer Squadron utilities specialist. "It gave me a good idea about how my reaction time would be affected by drinking and driving. It really brought to life the possible effects of having a slower reaction time while operating a vehicle." 

The Save-A-Life Tour concluded after all Airmen had the opportunity to operate the simulator. The tour succeeded at its hard-hitting approach, instilling information about the hazards behind drinking and driving.