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AADD specializes in saving lives

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --  Airmen needing to use an alternate form of transportation home when intoxicated should not hesitate to call the Airmen Against Drunk Driving hotline at 606-2233. Airmen interested in volunteering to be a dispatcher or a driver should contact Sergeant Yates at the 30th Medical Support Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo graphic / Airman 1st Class Andrew Satran)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Airmen needing to use an alternate form of transportation home when intoxicated should not hesitate to call the Airmen Against Drunk Driving hotline at 606-2233. Airmen interested in volunteering to be a dispatcher or a driver should contact Sergeant Yates at the 30th Medical Support Squadron. (U.S. Air Force photo graphic / Airman 1st Class Andrew Satran)

VANCENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- "Service before self" - it's a core value Airmen begin hearing in their recruiter's office before basic military training, and a value that one organization helps Airmen follow every weekend.

Airmen Against Drunk Driving allows Airmen to put their friends, family and the Air Force first by giving them an alternative to drinking and driving.

AADD has made a real impact in the mission at Vandenberg this year alone.

"This year we have made 151 saves," said Staff Sgt. Carolyn Yates, the AADD driver schedule manager. "Although we don't want anyone to be in a situation where they have to call us, it is good to know we were available when needed."

Anytime an Airman is selfish and chooses to drink and drive it is harmful to the Air Force mission.

"Every Airman is important," said Master Sgt. Adam McComb, acting 30th Space Wing and 30th Force Support Squadron first shirt. "When someone makes a selfish decision to drink and drive they won't be able to perform their duty, and that will begin a negative ripple effect in the squadron."

The AADD team is not a Gestapo for base leadership. They are here to help careers, not hurt.

"We aren't going to drop you off and go to wing leadership and tell them who we picked up," Sergeant Yates said. "The process is completely anonymous, we might ask for information like your name when you call so the driver can identify you."

Helping is what they do; however, AADD should not be looked at as a plan but as an alternative when someone's original plan goes awry.

"We are here for people, but everyone who is drinking should have a plan how to get home," Sergeant Yates said. "We are not the plan, just the backup plan."
Airmen needing to use this alternate form of transportation when intoxicated should not hesitate to call the AADD hotline at 606-2233. Airmen interested in volunteering to be a dispatcher or a driver should contact Sergeant Yates at the 30th Medical Support Squadron.