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Facility excellence flight maintains Vandenberg structures

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --  The 30th Civil Engineer Squadron facility excellence flight has worked on many projects across Vandenberg, including the G.I. Java. The flight has the responsibility of making sure Vandenberg facilities meet the standards and expectations of the Air Force, as well as leading design and building projects throughout the base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Olds)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- The 30th Civil Engineer Squadron facility excellence flight has worked on many projects across Vandenberg, including the G.I. Java. The flight has the responsibility of making sure Vandenberg facilities meet the standards and expectations of the Air Force, as well as leading design and building projects throughout the base. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Jonathan Olds)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Driving past the headquarters building, for some Airmen, is an everyday part of life. However, for the 30th Civil Engineer Squadron Facility Excellence flight the building is an example of the work that the flight performs on a daily basis. 

The 30th CES/CECE has the responsibility of making sure Vandenberg facilities meet the standards and expectations of the Air Force, as well as leading design and building projects throughout the base. 

"Our team is made up of four architects and one interior designer," said Bob Griswold, 30th CES chief architect. "We inspect buildings to make sure they are meeting standards, as well as offer space and furniture planning, cost estimates and small design services." 

The flight has worked on several high profile buildings on base, to include the remodeling of the headquarters building, the G.I. Java, which is a free coffee house populated by dorm residents, and are currently working with the Pacific Coast Club to put new carpet in certain sections of the building. 

Although the flight, like the rest of the Air Force, is concerned about saving money, it is not the top priority in a project. 

"When someone puts in a work order, we will work our hardest to find the best possible solution to solve the problem in the long term," Mr. Griswold said. "If that means we have to spend a little more money, but we will be getting more out of the project in the long term, that is what we will suggest to our customer."

The flight doesn't cut corners, but they do work diligently to save money and protect the environment by recycling items and using modern energy saving devices. 

"We try our best to only recommend energy efficient light fixtures, as well as water maintainer faucets that regulate the amount of water used," said Victoria Ham-Hainsworth, a 30th CES staff architect. "We also have concrete crushed and reused after demolition." 

The flight also keeps a running tab on contracted construction companies that are actively pursuing ways to recycle goods after a job, Mr. Griswold said. 

All structures, including the aqua ducts in Rome, will eventually need some type of maintenance. This five person team is dedicated to helping people in need of maintenance, remolding or building. Their ability to keep Vandenberg's facilities meeting Air Force standards is a testament to the hard work that they put in daily to the infrastructure of the base. 

Anyone on base that is looking to remodel their facility should look at the Air Force "Facility Excellence standards" for building maintenance, which can be found on the Air Force portal.