An official website of the United States government
Here's how you know
A .mil website belongs to an official U.S. Department of Defense organization in the United States.
A lock (lock ) or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .mil website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

HomeNewsArticle Display

Public health helps Airmen work safely

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Staff SSgt. Travis Heath reviews physicals to make sure Airmen are fit to serve. The Public Health Flight was able to approve 500 Airmen to deploy around the world in 2006. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Wesley Carter)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Staff SSgt. Travis Heath reviews physicals to make sure Airmen are fit to serve. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Wesley Carter)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Deployment checklists, facility cleanliness and ergonomics, are just a few of the things that the 30th Medical Group's Public Health Flight deals with on a regular basis.

Deploying can be a busy and stressful time for every Airman. When preparing for a deployment, a medical evaluation must be done. The public health flight takes that worry away from deploying airmen by being a liaison between the clinic and the patient.

Public health is responsible for medical needs that are vital for deployment, like hearing conservation, immunizations and physical fitness profiles.

"One of our main jobs is to ensure that everything on the medical checklist gets completed," said Airman Alicia Fleshman, a public health flight apprentice. "We understand the stress that people are going through, we just ask for patience and cooperation."

The role of public health to a deploying Airman is vital, but not nearly as important as it is in a deployed environment.

"In a deployed location, the nationals of the country do a lot of the cooking, so public health has to inspect their food handling and make sure it is at the same standard as ours," said Staff Sgt. Travis Heath, a public health technician. "We also give briefings on health hazards that are specific to a deployed location."

The flight also informs Airmen in there work habitat.

"Recently, as a part of public health week, we have been going around to shops like (the 30th Logistics Readiness Squadron) and (the 30th Civil Engineer Squadron) to speak on operational awareness," Airman Fleshman said. "Things like how to sit in a chair properly or the proper way to lift heavy equipment."

Lifting can be strenuous on anybody, but especially strenuous on someone who is pregnant.

"We inform women who are pregnant on the things they should stay away from in order to protect their child," Airman Fleshman said. "Things like shooting or lifting heavy objects."

The flight is a wealth of medical knowledge and services, and their continuous support of Vandenberg Airmen helps ensure the base runs smoothly and safely.