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Military Working Dogs Help Protect Base Personnel

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Senior Airman Shawna Richards, a entry controller with the 30th Security Forces Squadron, trains her military working dog, Baiky,on Feb. 26. Security forces train their bomb and drug sniffing dogs to seek out illegal items and potential threats. Handlers prepare the dogs for duty using obstacles designed to simulate real scenarios. Military working dogs have been used by the U.S. armed forces since World War I. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christian Thomas)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Senior Airman Shawna Richards, a entry controller with the 30th Security Forces Squadron, trains her military working dog, Baiky,on Feb. 26. Security forces train their bomb and drug sniffing dogs to seek out illegal items and potential threats. Handlers prepare the dogs for duty using obstacles designed to simulate real scenarios. Military working dogs have been used by the U.S. armed forces since World War I. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christian Thomas)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Senior Airman Shawna Richards, a entry controller with the 30th Security Forces Squadron, trains her military working dog, Baiky,on Feb. 26. Security forces train their bomb and drug sniffing dogs to seek out illegal items and potential threats. Handlers prepare the dogs for duty using obstacles designed to simulate real scenarios. Military working dogs have been used by the U.S. armed forces since World War I. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christian Thomas)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Senior Airman Shawna Richards, a entry controller with the 30th Security Forces Squadron, trains her military working dog, Baiky,on Feb. 26. Security forces train their bomb and drug sniffing dogs to seek out illegal items and potential threats. Handlers prepare the dogs for duty using obstacles designed to simulate real scenarios. Military working dogs have been used by the U.S. armed forces since World War I. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christian Thomas)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Senior Airman Shawna Richards, a entry controller with the 30th Security Forces Squadron, trains her military working dog, Baiky,on Feb. 26. Security forces train their bomb and drug sniffing dogs to seek out illegal items and potential threats. Handlers prepare the dogs for duty using obstacles designed to simulate real scenarios. Military working dogs have been used by the U.S. armed forces since World War I. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christian Thomas)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Senior Airman Shawna Richards, a entry controller with the 30th Security Forces Squadron, trains her military working dog, Baiky,on Feb. 26. Security forces train their bomb and drug sniffing dogs to seek out illegal items and potential threats. Handlers prepare the dogs for duty using obstacles designed to simulate real scenarios. Military working dogs have been used by the U.S. armed forces since World War I. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Christian Thomas)