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AFSPC commander visits VAFB

Gen. John Hyten, commander, Air Force Space Command, is greeted by Chief Master Sgt. William “DJ” Jones, 30th Space Wing command chief, and his wife Jenny, Jan. 28, 2015, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. As part of Hyten’s first visit to Vandenberg since taking command, he received an aerial tour on an HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter and tours of the Western Range Operations Control Center (WROCC) as well as various units on base. He also held an All-Call to address his views on leadership and future space capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ian Dudley/Released)

Gen. John Hyten, commander, Air Force Space Command, is greeted by Chief Master Sgt. William “DJ” Jones, 30th Space Wing command chief, and his wife Jenny, Jan. 28, 2015, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. As part of Hyten’s first visit to Vandenberg since taking command, he received an aerial tour on an HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter and tours of the Western Range Operations Control Center (WROCC) as well as various units on base. He also held an All-Call to address his views on leadership and future space capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ian Dudley/Released)

Gen. John Hyten, commander, Air Force Space Command, is interviewed by a 60 Minutes television crew in front of Space Launch Complex-2, Jan. 28, 2015, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Hyten was interviewed as part of a 60 Minute special highlighting AFSPC capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ian Dudley/Released)

Gen. John Hyten, commander, Air Force Space Command, is interviewed by a 60 Minutes television crew in front of Space Launch Complex-2, Jan. 28, 2015, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Hyten was interviewed as part of a 60 Minute special highlighting AFSPC capabilities. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ian Dudley/Released)

Gen. John Hyten, commander, Air Force Space Command, secures his safety harness during a 30th Mission Support Group demonstration, Jan. 29, 2015, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. As part of the demonstration, Hyten received a ride in an elevated work platform, also known as a cherry picker. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ian Dudley/Released)

Gen. John Hyten, commander, Air Force Space Command, secures his safety harness during a 30th Mission Support Group demonstration, Jan. 29, 2015, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. As part of the demonstration, Hyten received a ride in an elevated work platform, also known as a cherry picker. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Ian Dudley/Released)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- General John E. Hyten, commander, Air Force Space Command recently visited VAFB to tour base facilities and meet with base personnel, Jan. 28.

As part of Hyten's first visit to Vandenberg since taking command, he received an aerial tour on an HH-60 Pave Hawk helicopter and tours of the Western Range Operations Control Center as well as various units on base. He also held an All-Call to address his views on leadership and future space capabilities.

"Vandenberg is a very important base for space command and it's great for Gen. Hyten to come out here and see it with his own eyes," said Lt. Col. Michael Wulfestieg, 14th Air Force chief of current operations. "We were able to get him an aerial tour so that he could see the scope and size of the base and understand some of the challenges with maintaining the infrastructure and give him a better appreciation for the base."

In addition to touring and interacting with Airmen from around the base, Hyten received a hands-on perspective of various organizations and their functions.

"It was really nice to be able to show him what we do, and for him to see how everything runs here," said Staff Sgt. Robert Taron, 30th Civil Engineer Squadron heavy equipment operator. "He was very appreciative and down to earth. We are 'dirt-boys', so we don't normally get a lot of exposure, this was really nice to have a little light shine on us and the work we do."

His two-day visit culminated in an All-Call where, Hyten addressed the base populace and outlined his priorities for AFSPC.

"We have two roles in space command, most important we defend the nation, but we also have an obligation to defend mankind's access to space," said Hyten.

He emphasized the integral role of AFSPC in combat operations around the world, through cyber and space support.

"It is a sacred obligation of this command to win today's fight," said Hyten. "Everything that we do is critical to every mission that takes place on the globe today. Whether it's combat operations in Afghanistan, the fight against ISIL (Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant) or the humanitarian operations around the world, every mission that the United States military accomplishes is because of the space and cyber capabilities that we provide in Air Force Space Command. We are in the fight every day, it doesn't matter where you work or what you do - you have a role to play in that fight."