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Fallen warriors remembered

Senior Airman Devin Dotson, 30th Security Force Squadron commander’s support staff, is silhouetted as he lights a ceremonial candle during a vigil, May 15, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The ceremony was part of National Police Week and commenced with SFS members conducting a 24-hour guard of the vigil and transitioned to the reading of 120 names of those killed in the line of duty, including ten civilian officers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shane Phipps/Released)

Senior Airman Devin Dotson, 30th Security Force Squadron commander’s support staff, is silhouetted as he lights a ceremonial candle during a vigil, May 15, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. The ceremony was part of National Police Week and commenced with SFS members conducting a 24-hour guard of the vigil and transitioned to the reading of 120 names of those killed in the line of duty, including ten civilian officers. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shane Phipps/Released)

Senior Airman Devin Dotson, 30th Security Force Squadron commander’s support staff, prepares to light ceremonial candles during a vigil, May 15, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Although police week consists of numerous events aiming to celebrate those who paid the ultimate price, this particular observance is a source of immense pride for the 30th SFS. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shane Phipps/Released)

Senior Airman Devin Dotson, 30th Security Force Squadron commander’s support staff, prepares to light ceremonial candles during a vigil, May 15, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. Although police week consists of numerous events aiming to celebrate those who paid the ultimate price, this particular observance is a source of immense pride for the 30th SFS. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shane Phipps/Released)

Guests gather for a 24-hour vigil and candle-lighting ceremony, May 15, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. As part of National Police Week, Airmen with the 30th Security Forces Squadron remembered their fallen comrades during the vigil. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shane Phipps/Released)

Guests gather for a 24-hour vigil and candle-lighting ceremony, May 15, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. As part of National Police Week, Airmen with the 30th Security Forces Squadron remembered their fallen comrades during the vigil. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Shane Phipps/Released)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- As part of National Police Week, Airmen with the 30th Security Forces Squadron recently remembered their fallen comrades through a 24-hour vigil and candle-lighting ceremony here, May 15.

The ceremony commenced with SFS members conducting a 24-hour guard of the vigil and transitioned to the reading of 120 names of those killed in the line of duty, including ten civilian officers. As each name was read, a commemorative candle was lit in their memory.

"The vigil starts out dark and bleak, representing the unknown (perils) those (who are remembered) faced, but by the end it's bright and inspirational, representing the safety and security their sacrifice gave," said Tech. Sgt. Carmine Androsiglio, 30th SFS unit trainer. "The ceremony ensures those who made the ultimate sacrifice are not forgotten. The Defenders and Peace Officers gave their lives to protect those behind them - family-members, brothers and sisters-in-arms and complete strangers who they swore to protect."

Although police week consists of numerous events aiming to celebrate those who paid the ultimate price, this particular observance is a source of immense pride for the 30th SFS.

"Throughout the week we do different events honoring those who have fallen, but this ceremony, specifically, shows the dedication our squadron has for those who have passed away," said Tech. Sgt. Danielle Carver, 30th SFS assistant flight chief. "The guards are out here protecting the vigil throughout the night and it really shows how much we respect and honor those we have lost."

Some Defenders were afforded the somber honor of lighting the candle representing someone they knew personally. One such Airman was Staff Sgt. Corin Dolson, 30th SFS patrolman and dispatcher, who emotionally recalled his 2013 Afghanistan deployment with Staff Sgt. Todd Lobraico.

"We were deployed to Afghanistan together," explained Dolson. "I was a radio telephone operator and dispatcher for him. I would watch outside-the-wire patrols on a live feed. I was watching his patrol when they took fire. I lost radio communication and ended up relaying communications through some of the (aircraft in the area). I ended up communicating a medevac with para-rescue."

Despite being evacuated within a one-hour window of time following traumatic injury, known as the "golden hour", Lobraico succumbed to his injuries.

"It was an absolute honor to be at this event," said Dolson. "I really don't have words for how moving and powerful it is for me to be able to do this for someone I knew and worked with. It gives me so much pride in what I do and makes me want to do everything I possibly can to be a better Airman and wingman."