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Airmen talk separation

Master Sgt. Nathan Gilroy, Air Force Reserve recruiter, explains the benefits of joining the Air Force Reserve to Airmen during a force reduction briefing here Thursday Jan. 16, 2014. Due to on-going budgetary constraints, the Air Force is currently preparing to trim roughly 25,000 Airmen from its ranks. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Shane M. Phipps)

Master Sgt. Nathan Gilroy, Air Force Reserve recruiter, explains the benefits of joining the Air Force Reserve to Airmen during a force reduction briefing here Thursday Jan. 16, 2014. Due to on-going budgetary constraints, the Air Force is currently preparing to trim roughly 25,000 Airmen from its ranks. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Shane M. Phipps)

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. -- Due to on-going budgetary constraints, the Air Force is preparing to trim roughly 25,000 Airmen from its ranks.

With this proposition inevitably affecting numerous Airmen and their families, VAFB recently held an informational forum for enlisted members here Jan. 16.

"This briefing is to help assist members when making career impacting decisions," said Staff Sgt. Sheryll Houston, 30th Force Support Squadron NCOIC of promotions. "The overview of the briefing is on the fiscal year 14 force management programs such as palace chase, temporary early retirement authority, voluntary separation pay, the quality force review board and enlisted retention boards."

Enlisted members present were able to receive answers to questions like, "If a person on the quality force review board roster elects to voluntarily separate, are they entitled to pay?"

"Quality force review members, on the roster, can voluntarily separate but they will not receive voluntary separation pay," explained Houston. "They can choose to separate early and not receive any pay, or they can meet the retention board and receive involuntary separation pay."

Despite cuts to active-duty positions, many Airmen will still be afforded the opportunity to continue their service in the Air Force Reserve.

"With force shaping a reality, knowing what options are out there is important to making an informed decision for the next chapter," said Master Sgt. Nathan Gilroy, Air Force Reserve recruiter. "The Air Force Reserve allows active-duty Airmen facing these career-changing choices an avenue for continued service."

Allowing individuals to preserve their benefits while simultaneously relieving the Air Force of its active-duty overage, the Reserve can be a viable route for those applicable.

"When active-duty Airmen decide to continue their careers in the Reserve, everyone wins," said Col. Steve Fulaytar, Air Force Reserve's director of recruiting. "The Airman retains the benefits of continued service, the Reserve gains an Airman who can contribute immediately, and the regular Air Force has one less Airman facing involuntary separation."

For more information on force reductions, contact career development at 805-606-4821, and for more information on the Air Force Reserve, contact Master Sgt. Nathan Gilroy at 805-606-2704.