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Emergency management evaluation tests Team V

A Search and Recovery team examine a simulated aircraft crash site, June 7, 2016, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. In an effort to measure proficiencies and deficiencies, Airmen throughout Vandenberg recently participated in a base-wide emergency management evaluation.

A Search and Recovery team examine a simulated aircraft crash site, June 7, 2016, Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. In an effort to measure proficiencies and deficiencies, Airmen throughout Vandenberg recently participated in a base-wide emergency management evaluation.

VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. --

In an effort to measure proficiencies and deficiencies, Airmen throughout Vandenberg recently participated in a base-wide emergency management evaluation, here, June 7.

The inspection began with a simulated aircraft crash and culminated with an emergency management scenario, including a demonstrated Search and Recovery situation.

“The purpose of this specific evaluation was to test the readiness of our emergency management functions on the base,” said Maj. Michael Molesworth, 30th Space Wing director of inspections. “It was based upon our ability to showcase major accident response.”

These evaluations prepare Team V members for circumstances that differ from everyday operations.

“Besides the day-to-day duties that happen here at Vandenberg, every unit has a mission function they’re expected to provide in times of conflict or need, and these exercises are one way to evaluate the readiness or identify what’s going right and what kind of deficiencies exist,” said Molesworth. “That helps the commanders and the leadership identify where they need to work with their units on improving or identifying strengths that may be able to help other units across the board.”

Contrary to simulated events, hands-on demonstrations provide a more precise depiction of Vandenberg’s strengths and flaws.

“You don’t get an accurate reading from simulations, demonstration is key,” said Tech. Sgt. Joel Pearce, 30th SW evaluations planner. “By simulating, you tend to not think the processes and procedures through and avoid putting yourself in that stressful environment that puts your critical thinking to the test.”

While every Airman has their own unique challenges, it is crucial that they remain equipped for any potential threats at a moment’s notice.

“When we do these evaluations, we try to prepare the units not only for success, but so they can go back to their commanders and report accurate overall strengths and deficiencies within the unit to improve processes and procedures,” said Pearce. “Every unit has a day-to-day mission they have to prepare for, and then they have these emergency contingency operations they’re supposed to be planning for as well. They have to strike that balance between the two, and that’s kind of what these evaluations are picking at – how they’re maintaining that balance.”